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  • Posted On: 10-12-18, 1:58 pm (EDT) #1

    Feeling Nauseous

    October 12, 2018, 1:58 pm

    So the title and description pretty much says it all. I feel nauseous when doing some workouts, specifically compound movements such as deadlift and squat, or any cardio. This is not a new problem. I've had problems with this all throughout track and cross country in highschool, body conditioning my sophmore and senior year, and now persisting into my workouts at 20 years old. 

     

    At first I thought it was my diet. During highschool I never paid attention to my diet. After highschool I ran with a good friend of mine, and be simply said that it was because my body was burning calories, which could cause gas. When I continued to burp, excessively, he began to think it was my diet as well.

     

    I'm now doing Scott Herman's Push Pull Leg 12 week shred challenge and am really excited to see what I can do. I will say my diet is not perfect, but I am proud of how I reshaped it and my lifestyle. It hasn't been easy learning how to cook, and I'm still working on perfecting my diet. It is, however, a far better diet than I had. I haven't strayed away from simple carbs (except sugar of course. I cut down drastically on added sugars) such as white bread, but my carb, protein, and fat intake is getting close to on point. Yesterdays meal plan features 28% fat, 23% protein, and 49% carbs. I'm aware the fat is way to high and needs to sit at 20 percent, which is why I fixed that issue today. I ate just at my maintenance calories, because my overall goal is to simply see a loss in fat and replacement of it with muscle and not necessarily to just gain muscle because that would mean gaining fat too, and that isn't what I want to see. I am a new lifter (2 years of off and on lifting, never anything serious) so my body isn't in that great of shape, so I figured losing fat and gaining muscle was a perfectly reasonable goal considering newbie gains. 

    Ive been getting all the necessary vitamins, fats, minerals, and carbs. I weigh 175 pounds, 24% body fat, RMR: 1827.  BMR: 1656 and I am 5ft 11.

     

    Which begs the question: Why am I so gassy when I work out? I felt like I was going to throw up after a 15 minute hit cardio because of the amount of air in my stomach, and belched so much most of the air in my house is probably my own stomach gas at this point. Gross, right? I'm not obese, so could something simple like probiotic greek yogurt fix my woes?

  • Posted On: 10-12-18, 2:08 pm (EDT) #2

    Feeling Nauseous

    October 12, 2018, 2:08 pm

    Also, I've been using the food plan calculator on the muscular strength mobile app, and am quite fond if it. My protein intake goal, to be specific, is about 190g. To be honest I haven't figured my fat intake goal yet, which I need to do and stop procrastinating, I know, so in fact I'm going to do it now after I post this. The last thing I wanted to add is I am on the first week, fourth day of the 12 week shred plan.

  • Posted On: 10-13-18, 12:39 am (EDT) #3

    Feeling Nauseous

    October 13, 2018, 12:39 am
    Posted by: BeLeifIt

    So the title and description pretty much says it all. I feel nauseous when doing some workouts, specifically compound movements such as deadlift and squat, or any cardio. This is not a new problem. I've had problems with this all throughout track and cross country in highschool, body conditioning my sophmore and senior year, and now persisting into my workouts at 20 years old. 

     

    At first I thought it was my diet. During highschool I never paid attention to my diet. After highschool I ran with a good friend of mine, and be simply said that it was because my body was burning calories, which could cause gas. When I continued to burp, excessively, he began to think it was my diet as well.

     

    I'm now doing Scott Herman's Push Pull Leg 12 week shred challenge and am really excited to see what I can do. I will say my diet is not perfect, but I am proud of how I reshaped it and my lifestyle. It hasn't been easy learning how to cook, and I'm still working on perfecting my diet. It is, however, a far better diet than I had. I haven't strayed away from simple carbs (except sugar of course. I cut down drastically on added sugars) such as white bread, but my carb, protein, and fat intake is getting close to on point. Yesterdays meal plan features 28% fat, 23% protein, and 49% carbs. I'm aware the fat is way to high and needs to sit at 20 percent, which is why I fixed that issue today. I ate just at my maintenance calories, because my overall goal is to simply see a loss in fat and replacement of it with muscle and not necessarily to just gain muscle because that would mean gaining fat too, and that isn't what I want to see. I am a new lifter (2 years of off and on lifting, never anything serious) so my body isn't in that great of shape, so I figured losing fat and gaining muscle was a perfectly reasonable goal considering newbie gains. 

    Ive been getting all the necessary vitamins, fats, minerals, and carbs. I weigh 175 pounds, 24% body fat, RMR: 1827.  BMR: 1656 and I am 5ft 11.

     

    Which begs the question: Why am I so gassy when I work out? I felt like I was going to throw up after a 15 minute hit cardio because of the amount of air in my stomach, and belched so much most of the air in my house is probably my own stomach gas at this point. Gross, right? I'm not obese, so could something simple like probiotic greek yogurt fix my woes?

    @beleifit Don't be so concerned about your fat intake my bro, it's not too high at all. Your fat intake can be higher than 20% of your total calorie intake without any real issues, unless you have some kind of allergy to the fatty foods etc. But I don't want you thinking that 'fat makes you fat', because it's not true. Excess calories make you fat.

     

    Reducing your fat intake won't automatically mean you won't gain fat while bulking. You will always gain some fat while bulking. But you can keep it to a minimum if you keep your surplus small (250-500 calories above maintenance) and actually, if anything, keep carbs moderate. Also, after 2 years of training, a lot of newbie gains could be gone.. but there will likely still be some to be made if your training and diet have been average at best over the last 2 years.

     

    With your BMR.. is that actually supposed to be 2656? Instead of 1656? Otherwise yoru BMR is somehow lower than your BMR at rest haha.

     

    The gas could be a protein issue to an extent. Do you think it could be a lactose intolerance? And have you seen this video?

     

  • Posted On: 10-13-18, 12:55 pm (EDT) #4

    Feeling Nauseous

    October 13, 2018, 12:55 pm

    Thanks for the info on fat/carb intake @scott_herman That clears a few things up for me.

     

    Keep in mind when I say training off and on for 2 years, I definitely mean sometimes going to the gym 1-2 times a week, sometimes not at all for a month. I was doing it but I wasn't really serious about it, and my diet was garbage. Do you think that still means those newbie gain are gone? If so, should I focus on bulking/cutting insted of just eating my maintenance calories in hopes for a little of both from newbie gains?

     

    Also I have watched it but I'll take another look at it. I'm not lactose intolerant, but perhaps it's something like eating too soon before my routines that I just haven't been paying as much attention to as I need to. Or something including protein.

     

    I think I switched up my BMR and my RMR haha. My BMR should be roughly 200 calories or more higher than my RMR, right?

  • Posted On: 10-15-18, 12:26 am (EDT) #5

    Feeling Nauseous

    October 15, 2018, 12:26 am
    Posted by: BeLeifIt

    Thanks for the info on fat/carb intake @scott_herman That clears a few things up for me.

     

    Keep in mind when I say training off and on for 2 years, I definitely mean sometimes going to the gym 1-2 times a week, sometimes not at all for a month. I was doing it but I wasn't really serious about it, and my diet was garbage. Do you think that still means those newbie gain are gone? If so, should I focus on bulking/cutting insted of just eating my maintenance calories in hopes for a little of both from newbie gains?

     

    Also I have watched it but I'll take another look at it. I'm not lactose intolerant, but perhaps it's something like eating too soon before my routines that I just haven't been paying as much attention to as I need to. Or something including protein.

     

    I think I switched up my BMR and my RMR haha. My BMR should be roughly 200 calories or more higher than my RMR, right?

    @beleifit From how you describe your last 2 years, you probably do have some newbie gains left then if you get into a consistent lifting routine, while following a good, structured diet. So yes, eating at maintenance for a little bit might be a good idea.. maybe even jump straight into a small surplus and see how it goes in terms of muscle gain/fat loss. If you end up gaining a bit more fat than you'd like, go back to maintenance for a while.

     

    Yeah it's hard to say what the problem is.. it definitely sounds like a kind of digestion issue though.

     

    Yes, your BMR should be higher than your BMR at rest (or RMR). It should be probably 500 calories or more higher if you're training.

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