Back to List
Previous Article:
Cooking Methods: The Bad & The Not So Bad!
Next Article:
Make Your Own Pre-Workout Supplement!

Herbs & Fitness!

How To Integrate Herbs Into Your Daily Fitness Diet!

Posted by Magical1980 - September 28th, 2014

Hello again, Hermanites!


It's Matt again, and here we'll to go over how to integrate herbs into our fitness diets.

Earlier we discussed the basics of cooking which are fats, sugars, and salts, and some aromatic and vegetable combinations to rev up the flavor and taste. (see article here)


So today, let's look at some finer flavorings with herbs. Herbs are totally guilt free as they are all vegetable based and have no caloric content. Use as much or as little as you wish, because herbs are a fitness diet freebie.


Below I'll go over what each herb adds to a dish and how best to cook with it.


Most of the herbs listed below are trademarks of European cuisines, like French and Italian.


Bouquet Garni: Is used in all sorts of soups, stews, stocks, roasts, etc. in French cuisine; it is a combination of parsley, thyme, and bay leaf.

Image title

Bay Leaf: Taste is acidic and bitter and releases its aroma over time; best used in a slow cooked dish like a stew or braise.

Image title


Thyme: Taste is citrusy (echoes lemon) and releases its aroma over time; best used in a slow cooked dish like a stew or braise.

Image title


Rosemary: Taste is piney/woodsy and releases its aroma over time; best used in a slow cooked dish like a stew or braise.

Image title


Parsley: Taste is grassy and fresh; can be used raw (like in a salad) or cooked with and releases its aroma quickly; comes in two types curly (used in Latin cuisine) and flat leaf (used in European cuisines).
|

Image title

Image title


Chives: Taste is mildly onion-like; best used raw and fresh; not suitable for cooking.


Green Onion: Taste is moderately onion-like; best used raw and fresh; not suitable for cooking.

Image title


Cilantro: Taste is bright and lively; can be used raw (like in a salsa) or cooked with and releases its aroma quickly; used a lot in Latin, Caribbean, and South Asian cuisines.

Image title


Oregano: Taste is bitter but warm and releases its aroma over time; best used in a slow cooked dish like a stew or braise; used a lot in Mediterranean and Latin cuisines.

Image title


Basil: Taste is fresh and peppery; can be used raw (like in a pesto) or cooked with and releases its aroma quickly.

Image title


Sage: Taste is warm and releases its aroma over time; best used in a slow cooked dish like a stew or braise.

Image title

If this article helped you and you'd like to learn more ways to maximize your results, SIGN-UP for the Platinum Membership today!

Share this article on:
posted by Magical1980
Find me on:
Studied under Martin Yan- The King of Chinese Cuisine
Prep & line cook for 2.5 years before becoming Maitre d'
CHECK OUT MORE GREAT ARTICLES BELOW!
How To: Pull-Up

Today I’m going to go over the three golden rules when performing a pull-up. Just like every other article in the golden rules...

MEMBER COMMENTS
user profile image